Sunday, 9 July 2017

Through the Barricades


Through the Barricades

I was driving through the Glasgow rain recently listening to the radio when the Spandau Ballet hit ‘Through the barricades’ came on. ‘Do you know the story behind that song?’ my friend enquired. I said that it sounded as if it was basically a song about star crossed lovers on different sides of a conflict. Some of the lyrics were consistent with the Troubles but it was basically fictional wasn’t it? As we drove on my friend told me about a Celtic fan by the name of Thomas Reilly, better known to his friends as ‘Kidso.’

Belfast boy Kidso was Celtic mad by all accounts and would even on occasion skip the boat at Larne to get to Scotland and then hitch to Glasgow such was his love for the Hoops. He was the life and soul of the party, quick to give you a song and a bit of craic. His older brother Jim was the drummer for Irish Punk band, Stiff Little Fingers and Kidso enjoyed music too.  Jim got him a job as a roadie and he worked with some of the big bands of the era such as Spandau Ballet, The Fun boy Three, Paul Weller and Bananarama. He still headed for Celtic Park when the opportunity arose and his passion for Celtic never waned.

Kidso was home in Belfast in the summer of 1983 and was heading home to his folks’ place when he and his mates were stopped by a patrol of British Soldiers. After answering their questions and facing the sort of harassment young Irish lads often endured in those days, Kidso headed off. He was wearing just a pair of shorts and carrying his T shirt as it was a hot August evening. It is not disputed what happened next; one of the soldiers dropped to one knee and took aim at Kidso. As his friends looked on the soldier shot him in the back and killed him. The soldier in question was convicted of murder in a court of law as the Judge refused to accept his version of events in which claimed an unarmed man wearing shorts and walking away was a threat to the army patrol.

Astonishingly the soldier who was given a life sentence was released in 22 months and allowed to rejoin his Regiment.

As you’d expect, the death of Thomas ‘Kidso’ Reilly had a huge effect on his family and friends as did the lack of any real justice. Despite coming from a nationalist background, he was more into music and Celtic than politics. Pop band Bananarama attended his funeral and Spandau Ballet, Depeche Mode, Altered Images and The Jam sent wreaths to express their respect. Gary Kemp of Spandau Ballet said a few years later....

"I'd been to Ireland a few times - it was quite shocking for privileged boys as we were. When we went back in 1985, Jim Reilly offered to take me to Falls Road to visit the grave of Thomas. As I took that walk, I could see the barricades set up dividing the two main streets, the Protestant side and the Catholic side. It didn't occur to me to write a song at that point, but it was a huge influence. I was living in Ireland about a year later, and 'Through The Barricades' came to me in one evening. About two in the morning, lyrics started appearing in my head and I picked up a guitar - this has never happened to me before. I felt like the song was leading me itself.



Incidents like the murder of Kidso Reilly were sadly all too common in the darker days of the troubles and those who lived through those times have many such tales to tell. Kidso is remembered in commemorations and on a plaque on a wall in his home town. His parents, Jim and Bridie Reilly were of course heart-broken at the loss of their son as was the rest of the family. The British media made much of his links to the music industry and in a sense he lost his identity, becoming the ‘Road Manager’ of a pop group rather than a loving son and brother. The press initially claimed his death had occurred in ‘disputed’ circumstances but of course the Judge had the vision to see through the lies.

It’s amazing how a discussion about a song can lead you to discovery stories like that of Thomas Reilly. In remembering him today I make no political points or judgements.  I merely recall a fellow Celtic fan lost at a tragically young age to a callous and cowardly act. Thankfully more tranquil times have come to his home city and such acts are hopefully consigned to history forever. With Celtic due in Belfast next week to play Linfield there will be no doubt bellicose noises from some but the city is transformed in many ways since those darker times.

I hope Celtic play to their form and win well at Windsor Park. Kidso would have liked that.

Rest in Peace Kidso and all the innocents lost in the Troubles.






7 comments:

  1. I rarely comment (perhaps i should?) but I really appreciate and enjoy your writing. This piece is no exception and I am the better for reading it. Thank you.

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    1. Thank you Donald, I'm just an ordinary fan who speaks from the heart. There are many stories about Celtic triumphs and disasters on the field and they have their place but so too do the tales of the ordinary fans. Thank you for taking the time to read my ramblings. HH

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  2. Now...now l understand the lyrics...thank you. R.I.P. young man.

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    1. I always knew the reference to 'The Terrible Beauty' was lifted from Yeats Poem 'Easter 1916 so it knew there was an Irish element to it...

      I write it out in a verse—
      MacDonagh and MacBride
      And Connolly and Pearse
      Now and in time to be,
      Wherever green is worn,
      Are changed, changed utterly:
      A terrible beauty is born.

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  3. Have never posted before however felt a strong urge to do so. How very touching and sad. I recall the incident vividly from my youth and could picture the events unfold as I read, including the tragic outcome which I foresaw as I continued to read. Was similarly unnaware of the songs origins and now view it in a different light. An excellent and moving piece of writing. RIP Kidso. You'll never walk alone.

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  4. God Bless Kidso Taken far too young An eye opener to the way things were then AND THEY CALL US TERRORISTS

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  5. Loved this song growing up in the 80's and never knew the connection. Excellent read.

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